Boss Moves As An Entrepreneur

Entrepreneurs are a special breed. They’re wired for risk and kiss my ass moments. They want to do the very thing you tell them they can’t. They want to change the stuff you said couldn’t be changed. They want to sleep til noon, work til 4am, and live on Starbucks or is that just me?


As a Business Coach, I found my clients wave the same flag as me when it comes to being a boss. I will put in 80 hours for myself, making five figures vs. working fewer hours and making more money for someone else. I do this because it frees me from restricting my earnings, creativity, and possibilities. I am no longer confined by the parameters of someone else's thinking.


Bosses are people who want you to set limits, follow instructions, and toe the line. There are those who are okay with that. They like to operate in a structured environment with clear direction. That is not possible for an entrepreneur. They thrive on the rollercoaster ride of what's around the corner.


Even at my most broke, I could not return to that type of confinement. The thought of a high-pressure job that doesn't benefit my family and me makes me twitch. I don't want someone telling me how far I can go. I don't want someone patting me on the back for an idea that makes them millions and leaves me with gas money.


Take for instance the guy who invented Post-It Notes. I was astounded to find that he was not an entrepreneur. He was an employee who created a product that made someone else infinitely wealthy. Did he share in the profits? Does his family live off the residual income? I seriously doubt it. He was limited to his paycheck and pension.


Another example is our own government shut down. If this doesn't scream I own you, I don't know what does. People are REQUIRED to work without expectation of a paycheck. What kind of nonsense is that? They are limited by their circumstance and dependency on a paycheck. Does the shut down affect those who are responsible for it? Oh, wait, NO! They have money.


MONEY MONEY MONEY

The golden rule of an entrepreneur is that you if you don’t work, you don’t eat. When we had our restaurants, everyone knew my first rule, “Don't mess with my money.”


There is an old saying, “I pay the cost to be the boss.” People who complain about those in charge not sharing the wealth are short-sighted. They think because you’re an entrepreneur you’re flush with cash. The truth may be you’re struggling just as much as your employs. But since you don’t want to continue to operate on that level, you take calculated risk they’re not willing to take. You work long after they’ve clocked out and gone on weekend getaways.


If you’re trying to be an entrepreneur, but you’re not willing to put in the work to make your money, don't waste your time playing the role of an entrepreneur. It's what I teach my daughter. It what I teach kids who take my Teenpreneur Business Bootcamp. The first lesson is getting the right mindset.


I want them to know if they say yes, do it like a boss. Do it on their terms. I want to catch them before they get on the hamster wheel of faking the baller lifestyle. I let them know they can't be a baller if they depend on their parents for rent money and have no exit strategy when leaving the workforce. I teach them to manage their money, not spend it. The lesson is to maintain and leverage your finances to make the next boss move.


I can’t be bossed because I want to operate in a way that does not limit my creativity, abilities, and definitely not my money. I can't be bossed because I want to raise them.

© 2018-2020 by CKO Creator - Medford Oregon - (562) 356-8111